History Of C Programming Language

In this article, we are going to talk about an interesting comprehensive History of C programming language and the time when C was developed Microsoft did not exist. C was originally developed by Dennis Ritchie between 1969 and 1973 at Bell Labs who also created UNIX.

The main Purpose of C programming language was to rewrite the UNIX which was originally written in assembly language because It was believed that OS Development should be done in assembly language but C has put an end to this myth.

The history of C programming language is very much tied to a book written by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie who both worked on UNIX together.

The C programming language

The language B, which was derived directly from Martin Richards BCPLwas developed in 1969-70 by Ken Thompson.
The greatest drawback of the B language was it doesn’t support data-types though it was high-level language and another functionality that the B language did not provide was the use of “structures”.

By holding most of the B Language syntax Dennis M. Ritchie turned the B language into the C language by adding-up data-types and many other changes.
The C language had a powerful combination of high-level functionality and the detailed features required to program an operating system.
Therefore many of the UNIX components were eventually rewritten in C. For years the book “The C Programming Language, 1st edition” was the standard on the language C.

Furthermore, in 1983 a committee was formed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to develop a modern definition of the programming language C (ANSI X3J11).
In 1988 they delivered the final standard definition ANSI C. The standard was based on the book from K&R 1st ed.

The standard ANSI C made little changes to the original outlook of the C language. (They had to make sure that old programs still operated with the new changes).

Later on, the ANSI C standard was approved and adopted by theInternational Standards Organization (ISO).
The correct term should, therefore, be ISO C, but everybody still calls ANSI C.

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